access

Lack of internet access continues to impact students’ online learning experiences – The Cavalier Daily

Varied accessibility to broadband internet has compromised the quality of education for University students, as most classes are online and rely on high speed internet for synchronous remote learning — just 27 percent of classes have an in-person component.

Broadband refers to a high-speed internet that is always on. According to a report from the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, approximately 10 percent of college students in Virginia do not have access to broadband. For Virginia students overall, those in rural areas tend to have less access than those in urban areas. The University, the City of Charlottesville and Albemarle County are all classified as rural according to the report.

Fourth-year College student Avery Gagne stayed home in Mechanicsville, Va. when students were sent back last spring and for the first two weeks of this semester. He has only one internet service provider available at his address. As

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Colorado spending $2M to provide internet access to students | Govt-and-politics

DENVER (AP) — Colorado will spend $2 million in federal pandemic relief funding to provide internet access to students who lack service as part of an overall effort to close the digital divide in both rural and urban parts of the state as the pandemic has forced many to rely on online learning.

State education commissioner Kathy Anthes announced the plan on Wednesday, joined by Gov. Jared Polis and Attorney General Phil Weiser. School districts will be able to apply for grants to pay for hotspots to provide internet access to households as well as things like mobile hotspot trucks that may work better in rural areas, she said.

“Broadband access is now an essential school supply. It’s a non negotiable,” she said at the Fort Logan Northgate School in the Sheridan School District 2 in Denver.

Weiser also announced that T-Mobile would provide up to 34,000 low-income student households

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Colorado schools get $2 million to support internet access

The state also partnered with T-Mobile to provide 34,000 WiFi hotspots and up to 100 gigabytes of data a year to low-income families who qualify.

DENVER, Colorado — Democratic Gov. Jared Polis announced Wednesday that $2 million from the CARES Act will be sent to districts to address the 65,000 students the state’s Department of Education (CDE) estimates who don’t have access to internet at home.

“They’re more likely to disengage and they’re more likely to fall behind,” Polis said at a news conference at the Sheridan School District.

While low COVID-19 cases in the state will push more students back into the classroom, families have to be prepared to go remote. Some won’t want to send students back right away and others might have no choice if a school experiences a virus outbreak.

The state also partnered with T-Mobile to provide 34,000 WiFi hotspots and up to 100 gigabytes

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Closing NV Schools ‘Digital Divide’ Means Better Internet Access

This is the fourth in a series of stories examining how school districts around the country are coping with the coronavirus pandemic. You can read the whole series here.

By Jackie Valley and Jazmin Orozco/The Nevada Independent

On weekdays in the spring, Angela McVicars began her mornings as a pseudo-information technology specialist. She would log onto the internet, rousing the connection from its slumber, and try to solve any problems before the clock struck 9 a.m.

That’s when her oldest daughter logged onto Zoom for a virtual class. A half hour later, her younger daughter did the same.

Even if McVicars had successfully launched the internet, a sense of foreboding clouded their remote learning. They knew it was a matter of when, not if, the internet connection would suddenly freeze and require a manual reboot — a process that could take a handful of minutes or close to an hour

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Genetec and HID survey shows higher education institutions ready to move from legacy access control systems and embrace new technology

Genetec and HID survey shows higher education institutions ready to move from legacy access control systems and embrace new technology

Genetec and HID survey shows higher education institutions ready to move from legacy access control systems and embrace new technology

Security Center Synergis access control system

Security Center Synergis access control system

to a survey of 1,800 higher education security and IT professionals conducted by Genetec Inc., a leading technology provider of unified security, public safety, operations, and business intelligence solutions and HID Global, a worldwide leader in trusted identity solutions. While organizations are ready to embrace new technology,

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